Monday, August 18, 2014

How much does race contribute to the fear about Southeast DC?











6 comments:

DaReslnt1 said...

I don't even think these people are scared. I think they are just looking for attention. They have that "group think" mentality. So sad, but at least 99% of them are white.

Anonymous said...

Yes, it has a lot to do with race. Because, crime is not unique to East of the River. In fact Wards 1, 2, 5, 6 each has more total crime than either 7 or 8.

Brian said...

I think race plays a huge role. These people probably have little personal knowledge (good or bad) of black people other than television and so they resort to fear out of ignorance. It's a common human reaction for people to fear what they do not know. People often choose to live where everything is predictable and where others are just like them. Also, they're probably just trying to get attention as DaResInt1 said. Great story to tell your friends, taking liberties with the facts of course. One last point: I think people who live in the suburbs just find ways to hate on the city because they have to rationalize why they commute 2 hours each day. And people in Northwest have to rationalize why they pay so much in rent to live there.

Anonymous said...

I drove into Del Ray the other day. Everyone was married with strollers. They stared at my car because it made too much noise. I thought they were going to find out where I lived and put community sanctions on the appearance of my lawn. It was so scary!

freez said...

Black people are scary, everything in american education and pop culture makes it so.

Anonymous said...

I have been mugged twice im my life. Each time was by a black male. I have had lovely black neighbors (though I have never lived in a mainly black neighborhood) and wonderful black co-workers. When I am walking in an area and see young black males, dressed in ways that appear to be "ghetto" or based on prison attire, I have to make a quick judgement of probability. Back when more formal dress was fashionable, it was at least possible to distinguish social class at a glance. Now that is more difficult. And its certainly not possible to distinguish character at a glance. So when I see a young black man dressed ghetto, I do not know if he is in fact middle class, a poor law abiding person, or a threat. That is reality.

I don't tweet though, and do not know what is behind that.